Events

POSTPONED--Disappearing Queer Spaces: A Dialogue

Papi
Image: The Papi Project:Public Cruising Spot #21, Belmont Harbor, Chicago, Illinois by Oli Rodriguez

This event is postponed.  Further details coming soon.

Hyde Park Art Center is pleased to present Disappearing Queer Spaces: A Dialogue in conjunction Precariat

Artist Oli Rodriguez, scholar Adam Greteman and another individual (TBA) will discuss how they explore the constant disappearance of Queer Spaces in their work and lives. Where do queers safely gather? How do we protect the spaces we have and grow new ones? Precarity plagues not only these spaces, but the bodies who activate them - how do we move forward? Dialogue will be followed by either a Q&A or group discussion with audience, whichever feels more appropriate after what unfolds during the panel.  Panel discussion will be moderated by Precariat curator Ariel Gentalen, 

Bios:

Oli Rodriguez is an interdisciplinary artist working in film, photography, and performance. 

Adam Greteman, Ph.D. is Director of the Masters of Arts in Teaching program and adjunct assistant professor of Art Education at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Affiliate Faculty member in Interdisciplinary Studies at Creighton University. His scholarship explores the historical, philosophical, and educational implications of sexuality and gender in education. His work has been published in various journals including Educational Theory, Journal of Philosophy and Education, Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, and QED: A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking. He is the co-author of the forthcoming book The Politics and Pedagogies of Liking (Routledge, 2017) and is currently working on a book length manuscript, Genders and Sexualities in Education: Toward Queer Thriving (Palgrave MacMillan, 2018), which offers a historical and philosophical intervention in queer studies in education.

Ariel Gentalen is a Chicago-based curator, writer, and educator interested in socially engaged art practices and interrogating art history through feminist and queer lenses.