Not Just Another Pretty Face 2019

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Alice Shaddle Baum: Fragments in a Fractured Space

Focusing on the processes of destruction and fissure, Alice Shaddle‘s series of collages made between 2001-2003 freeze the typical rapidity of time into still moments that explore the surreal, eerie, and alluring qualities of chaos of a post 9/11 world. Constructed from minute pieces of vinyl paper, which physically dismantle the actual works themselves, Shaddle’s collages present fragmented landscapes, twisting trees, and out-of-place objects no longer determined by the laws of gravity. A bright and sunny blue sky marked with floating office and building detritus is an example of the surreal state that Shaddle has captured in this emotional body of work. Taking one of its influences from media coverage of the events of September 11th, Shaddle’s collages explore the poignant emotions that still linger from the tragedy.

A small color catalog was produced in conjunction with the exhibition and includes examples of artwork from the previous fifty years of Shaddle’s career.

  • November 4, 2007 – February 3, 2008
  • Kanter McCormick Gallery

Alice Shaddle: Fragments in a Fractured Space

About Alice Shaddle

Alice Shaddle (Baum. d. 2017)  received a BFA (1954) and an MFA (1972) from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has been exhibited at numerous venues, including the Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), Art Institute of Chicago, Hyde Park Art Center, Artemisia Gallery, and Indianapolis Museum of Art. assistance from the Beckett family.  Shaddle taught children’s painting and drawing at the Hyde Park Art Center for over 50 years, was former chair and a founding member Artemisia Gallery, a women-owned artists collaborative and conservator and champion of the Frank Lloyd Wright Blossom House. She was married to Don Baum (artist and former Director of Hyde Park Art Center) and raised two children in addition to her prolific art career.

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